January Reads

Wayward Son

First book of 2020 was Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell. I had been looking forward to this book for over a year when I learned it was being release. And I wasn’t let down.

A sequel to the book Carry On, Wayward Son deals with the aftermath of being a child soldier, and what to do after your destiny is fulfilled.

The book moves between the points of view of Penny, Simon and Baz as they embark on a road trip across America to rescue Agatha, who has moved to San Diego to just get away from everything.

Fast-paced, and often heartbreaking, Rowell explores PTSD and depression as Simon and his friends struggle with their post-Chosen One life.

If you read and enjoyed Carry On, you will love this book.

Good Omens

Good Omens was the book my book club picked for the month. It was a light, funny read, and I enjoyed it, but, I think I would have enjoyed it more if I hadn’t watched the mini-series on Amazon Prime first.

Dealing with the Apocalypse, Crowley and Aziraphale, a demon and an angel respectively, try and find a way to stop it, because they love earth too much.

The book is full of humor and absurdity, and doesn’t take itself seriously at all, and I love that about the book.

You could tell Gaiman helped adapt the show for television, and was in fact the screen writer, as the books was very faithfully adapted, and the show follows not only the plot, but uses all the same dialogue.

The Blood of Elves

After bingeing the Netflix series with my husband during Christmas break, I absolutely fell in love with the high fantasy universe of The Witcher. I immediately put myself on the waiting list for the first book of the series at the library.

The book came in much quicker than I thought and I dove right in. Only to learn, this is in fact NOT the first book in the series, it’s technically the third (or second, depending on which list you look at). I didn’t let that deter me, I kept reading.

This book assumes you’re already familiar with the characters and the universe and just dives right into the conflicts. It is a quick read, full of lots of back and forth dialogue. Geralt is not featured heavily in the book, but Ciri and Yennefer are.

When Geralt is in the book, he is easily likeable, and there is always a fight scene that plays out so cinematically that I found myself holding my breath.

Now that I’ve finished this book, I’m waiting on pins and needles for the books that come before this one to arrive at the library for me to read.